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Sex & Mental Health – Sexual Well-being for Working Women

Sexual wellbeing for working women is a growing subject that is gaining emphasis on social sensitization in today’s modern society. With the increase in the number of women in the corporate and white-collar workforce, women’s sexual wellbeing needs a more eloquent address to empower women in general life settings.

The characteristics of sex and mental health in women

Sex is an important activity in the process of life and also for enhancing interpersonal priorities. Sexual wellbeing for women is just as essential as men do, to focus clearly on other utilitarian aspects of life. Many researchers have found links in the emotional and subjective paradigm of women are positively reinforced by her active sexual latency.

Sexual desire crops up among many young girls from as early as during the prepubescent stages, but as she transitions to a later chronological timeline, her sexual trigger could be compounded and varied, from one individual and cohort to another.

Some women are satisfied by the sensual pleasure from arousal by performing the act, some prefer sex to achieve orgasm, while others and mostly those nearing or have reached the menopausal stage—prefer sex only after certain emotional spaces have been entrenched and established.

How Sex Impact The Body and Mind

Sex plays many significant roles in regulating optimum levels of hormones, mental health, and our passive instincts. The residual effects of sex are not limited to the orgasmic biochemicals released during and after good sex, but the effect permeates across from a stimulated neurotransmitter to an increased emotional and physical satisfaction, which in turns leads to a revitalised level of commitment and mutual bonding among

Sex can benefit women in ways:

 Reduce intense levels of stress, both psychological and emotional.

Increase libido function
Lower the blood pressure
Improve immune system
Help rehabilitate self-esteem and confidence
Decrease and help cope with depression and anxiety
Induce better sleep
Build intimacy, closeness and mutual connection with your partner
Improve the quality of sexual organs and parts
Enhance fertility chances

Women should cater to the “extra-care” for herself.

Working women are often put under constant stress than not — from working tirelessly to earn wages to provide for the family—to fulfilling the duty of nurturing and looking out for the kids in all possible sphere of exercises — women hardly have any time and energy left by the end of the day — this means their sexual wellbeing is under perpetual threat, each day.

Women should know better that sex for her is similar to taking antidepressants to ward off tumultuous anxiety. Sex should be enjoyed by both partners equally and mutually for a lasting benefit.

Here are some steps women can practice to take control of her sexual inadequacy and imbalance.

Initiate quality talk: The first thing you can do is admit your discomfort in your daily settings to your partner. Opening up on your concerns in and around why you feel anxious may help stir a conversation.

Form a habit of mutual discourse: Once you and your partner have participated on the fundamental of your sexual malfunctioning and overall health impacts, you can engage in deeper levels, while increasing your confidence to be open to your partner about it.

Manage routine:  You may manage a timetable to have a mutual talk. Keep it interval-based, this way, you can both preserve your energy and stay in your emotional comfort zone, while staying proactive. 

Be always confident to take good care of your sexual wellbeing. Many strains of mental, physical, and psychological ailments, not to mention social-emotional imbalances, are associated with an individual’s dilapidated and deteriorating sexual health.

And being a functional individual, it should be complementary to prioritize your body and inner health, which is from where you draw the energy to produce fresh ideas and output and to stay efficient.

Site references:

https://www.health.harvard.edu/topics/womens-sexual-health
https://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/sexual-health/in-depth/womens-sexual-health/art-20047771
https://www.ohsu.edu/womens-health/benefits-healthy-sex-life

 

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